Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior (1981)

While the story in itself isn't groundbreaking by any stretch of the imagination, the spectacle is immense and the number of highly kinetic battle scenes on rag-tag vehicles are savage; definitely unlike anything cinema-going audiences had seen before. ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Im Keller (In The Basement) (2014)

Im Keller sells itself as a documentary, however there’s an element of staging to it that can’t be denied. There aren’t any actors involved. The protagonists aren’t fictional characters; they appear to be appearing as themselves. Or at least, some version of themselves.

Mad Max (1979)

When today’s young audiences think of Mad Max, their mind’s eye probably wanders towards the Tom Hardy-helmed road-rage epic. While Mad Max: Fury Road (2015) gives an unforgettable take on the same character and is also a product of George Miller’s mind, this feverish, highly kinetic desert epic is utterly dissimilar to anything that was presented to us back in ’79. 

The Exorcist (1973)

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ You’ve got your Star Wars light-sabres, your flying DeLorean and then there’s head-twisting Reagan. The image of the demon-infested girl is recognisable everywhere. The head spinning freak with the infected, lacerated face, sitting upright in bed spewing jets of green vomit all around her has not only become a staple image of horror but also one that universally signifies the horror genre.

Swiss Army Man (2016)

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ This is a character driven film and thus, Radcliffe and Dano’s performances are what make it what it is. Daniel Radcliffe is astounding in his Frankenstein-ish turn as the popeyed, deceased but slowly and surely re-gaining a grip on life Manny, while Paul Dano, is excellent, as always.

La Dolce Vita (1960)

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ What I’m sure of is that I’ve watched a very good, even great film which delivers an authoritative commentary on existentialism, while also serving as an effective satire on the concept of fame, even if the language it uses to communicate is stilted and rough round the edges. Catch La Dolce Vita at the Eden Cinemas on the 9th and 13th of August. Two shows only!

The Cement Garden (1994)

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ This film gives a stark, pessimistic picture of what, in different circumstances would have been a yellow-tinted, flowery depiction of one’s delicious teenage years. The time when one feels full of life. A period in life where romance or at least, touch, is lurking at the forefront of every interaction. When the name of the game is truth or dare and pretty much all tension is sexual... and when Summer days are endless, and everyone seems available, ready and willing. In Jack and Julie’s case, everyone is each other.

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